Campagne

Campagne

French restaurant e-commerce site redesign

Campagne

Campagne

French restaurant e-commerce site redesign

Campagne

Campagne

French restaurant e-commerce site redesign

Campagne

Campagne

French restaurant e-commerce site redesign

Campagne

Campagne

French restaurant e-commerce site redesign

 

My role

Research

UX Design

Timeline

6 days / group project

Tools 

Figma

Miro

Canva

Goal

To make a user-friendly online shop that showcases local produce and reaches more customers.

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Local shops and practitioners are suffering a decrease in the demand for their services and products due to the extreme situation COVID-19 pushed worldwide. This can affect local economies and many families. Alongside this, we can see true intent and a growing trend to support local businesses in many communities. 

Online presence is a good way to hijack the issue. More and more professionals are on the verge of their digital transition.

With this project, we aimed to bring the products our client sells closer to the customer and also make it available for a larger market. The scope is to create a personalised culinary experience

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Campagne is a small restaurant in Toulouse, France. Owners are young and with a desire to promote the local cuisine. Campagne is a fun, cellar-style eatery, specialising in locally sourced, organic cheese and meat platters, paired with wines from regional vineyards. Their website consists of one page, which tells you where to find them and a link to a mouth-watering Instagram account.
All their products are from local producers and some of the customers are already in love with their products.
They emphasise that their customers would like to order their products to consume at home and the demand has increased rapidly during this year’s covid lockdowns. It became clear that our goal was to make a user-friendly online shop that showcases local produce and reaches more customers.

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For this project, we wanted to design a desktop website for a local business or professional. We’re focusing our efforts on clearly organizing the information, to be most effective for both the customer and provider. A very important aspect was the  Interaction design pattern to make the exchange as streamlined as possible.
With this, we aimed to bring the products our client sells closer to the customer and also make it available for a larger market. We wanted to provide a personalised culinary experience
Owners, Patrick and David, are keen to have a website where you can taste with your eyes. Aside from in-store diners, they get lots of enquiries from people who want to buy some cheese or a bottle of wine to have at home and so an online selling facility would cater to these customers and expand their reach. They are also extremely passionate about what they sell and would like to use their website to promote local farmers and producers. They emphasise that their customers would like to order their products to consume at home and the demand has increased rapidly during this year’s covid lockdowns. It became clear that our goal was to make a user-friendly online shop that showcases local produce and reaches more customers.

Competitive analysis
Value proposition Canvas

The next step was to understand the customer. A typical Campagne customer is above all else, a gourmet enthusiast, who wants to know where their food comes from and enjoys combining flavours. Their audience spans a wide age group but we thought we would hone in on people who are inclined to enjoy a platter with friends in the evening, perhaps without having to consider family obligations.

We create Claire. She is 32 and has a job at Toulouse university. We create a scenario where Claire is “saved” by delivery from Campagne.

Claire
Claire

Persona

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Customer
Customer

Journey

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Claire
Claire

Persona

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Our focus then turned to the architecture of the site. How would the site be mapped out? We also created and analysed user flows and created a rather large and complicated user flow chart. It was important to us that the customer would be able to see suggestions and easily add these to their shopping cart. They would also be able to create customised gift hampers.

It was essential to think this step through properly in order to make the simplest and most efficient flow for the customer, given the number of options available.

site map
User flow

We started to sketch some lo-fi prototypes and put them to the test. At the same time, we also started looking at ways to add an exciting edge to our e-commerce website. We wanted to add an extra feature that would elevate the user experience and elevate the brand. 

After brainstorming, we settled on a clickable platter that would be placed on the landing page. The platter would showcase seasonal offerings and users can click on each item on the image and immediately see product details on a pop-up window, with an easy add to shopping cart or wish list option.

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We also looked at the product page display and decided a split-screen layout with static photos on the left side and scrollable information on the right side, allowing users to maximise “tasting with their eyes”, whilst obtaining detailed information on the product.
We tested out a low/mid-fi prototype and identified some missing features in the flow. It also became apparent that it was difficult to go back to certain pages in the process, which could be a potential pain point for the user.
With this in mind, we made adjustments and proceeded to create the mid-fi prototype.

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Before finishing the project we considered the next steps. We had created a moodboard to show potential branding on the site, with the desired minimal branding and ¨taste with your eyes¨ request from the owners. We would have liked to conduct further user testing and usability testing in order to refine and develop a hifi prototype to present back to the client and pursue development.

moodboard.jpg

In retrospect, we would like to spend more time refining our lo-fi prototypes. Due to time constraints, we started to build the mid-fi prototype whilst waiting for feedback on the low fi and this meant that a lot of time was spent adjusting the mid-fi afterwards.

On a practical level, our presentation was impacted by small fonts used in MIRO making it difficult to present our analysis and construction of site maps and user flows.

Project scope and Constraints:

We had just under a week to complete the project mid-fi prototype. It was emphasised that we produce an as-near-to-perfect mid-fi prototype as possible. Under normal circumstances, we would have worked more in the field, however, due to covid constraints, we had to proceed remotely. Whilst this was a constraint in some respects, it highlighted the importance of e-commerce facilities and the value of ¨getting it right¨.